Anisette Nibs

Anisette has a powerful flavor when drunk straight, and can even produce irritation to the throat if not taken slowly due to its high alcoholic content. In mixed drinks, however, it produces a sweet agreeable flavor.
cablestotheace:

Liu Xiaodong, Crazy Mess #3, oil on canvas, 33 x 38 cm, c.  2012

"Society and art’, he says, ‘should be like breathing – one breathes in and the other breathes out"

cablestotheace:

Liu Xiaodong, Crazy Mess #3, oil on canvas, 33 x 38 cm, c.  2012

"Society and art’, he says, ‘should be like breathing – one breathes in and the other breathes out"

usnatarchives:

This World War I veteran wore his uniform to enter Santa Anita Park assembly center. He joined other people of Japanese ancestry evacuated from the West Coast during World War II.  
Dorothea Lange took this photograph on April 5, 1942. 
Just a few weeks before, on February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt had signed Executive Order 9066. The War Department used this order almost exclusively to intern thousands  Americans of Japanese descent until the order was rescinded in 1944.
Today is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans interned during WWII. Read more about the Executive Order 9066 on the OurPresidents Tumblr.
Image: National Archives, 210-G-3B-424

usnatarchives:

This World War I veteran wore his uniform to enter Santa Anita Park assembly center. He joined other people of Japanese ancestry evacuated from the West Coast during World War II. 

Dorothea Lange took this photograph on April 5, 1942.

Just a few weeks before, on February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt had signed Executive Order 9066. The War Department used this order almost exclusively to intern thousands  Americans of Japanese descent until the order was rescinded in 1944.

Today is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans interned during WWII. Read more about the Executive Order 9066 on the OurPresidents Tumblr.

Image: National Archives, 210-G-3B-424

(via todaysdocument)

upworthy:

It’s Been Over 100 Years Since An Artist Has Done This In America. About Time Someone Did It Again.

More than a century has passed since a photographic journey explored Native Americans with such a broad scope and in this amount of detail. In 1906, photographer Edward S. Curtis was commissioned by J.P. Morgan to capture the “disappearing” race.
In 2014, to change perceptions about Native Americans, photographer Matika Wilbur believes we have to update the kind of imagery we’re looking at when we think of her race. It’s a beautiful — and important — idea.

upworthy:

It’s Been Over 100 Years Since An Artist Has Done This In America. About Time Someone Did It Again.

More than a century has passed since a photographic journey explored Native Americans with such a broad scope and in this amount of detail. In 1906, photographer Edward S. Curtis was commissioned by J.P. Morgan to capture the “disappearing” race.

In 2014, to change perceptions about Native Americans, photographer Matika Wilbur believes we have to update the kind of imagery we’re looking at when we think of her race. It’s a beautiful — and important — idea.

(via artistswithimpact)

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ipcny:

Artist Jin Joo Chae, who was featured this past fall in our News/Prints: Printmaking & the Newspaper show

5centsapound:

Nadia Myre, Indian Act

Indian Act speaks of the realities of colonization - the effects of contact, and its often-broken and untranslated contracts. The piece consists of all 56 pages of the Canadian Federal Government’s Indian Act mounted on stroud cloth and sewn over with red and white glass beads. Each word is replaced with white beads sewn into the document; the red beads replace the negative space.

(via artistswithimpact)

todaysdocument:

Acknowledging & Apologizing for the Overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii

President William Jefferson Clinton signing Public Law 103-150 in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, D.C., 11/23/1993. The resolution acknowledged the 100th anniversary of the January 17, 1893 overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii and offered an apology to Native Hawaiians on behalf of the United States for the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii. Vice President Albert Gore, Senators Daniel K. Inouye and Daniel K. Akaka and Representatives Patsy T. Mink and Neil Abercrombie are present. The image was photographed by Sharon Farmer.

For more context on the annexation of Hawaii, be sure to see:
Queen Liliuokalani’s Memorial in Protest from December 19, 1898, and
Joint Resolution of July 7, 1898, to Provide for Annexing the Hawaiian Islands to the United States

todaysdocument:

Acknowledging & Apologizing for the Overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii

President William Jefferson Clinton signing Public Law 103-150 in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, D.C., 11/23/1993. The resolution acknowledged the 100th anniversary of the January 17, 1893 overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii and offered an apology to Native Hawaiians on behalf of the United States for the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii. Vice President Albert Gore, Senators Daniel K. Inouye and Daniel K. Akaka and Representatives Patsy T. Mink and Neil Abercrombie are present. The image was photographed by Sharon Farmer.

For more context on the annexation of Hawaii, be sure to see:

(Source: research.archives.gov)

melaniecervantes:

The mural that my friends are painting the Native American Health Center is coming along nicely. They are aiming to paint 7 of these panels. #indigneousland #indianland #nahc #decolonize

melaniecervantes:

The mural that my friends are painting the Native American Health Center is coming along nicely. They are aiming to paint 7 of these panels. #indigneousland #indianland #nahc #decolonize

(via justseedsartists)

visualdrearns:

pradaprint:

Icaro Doria, a Brazilian man, working for a magazine in Portugal started this campaign using real data from the UN and flag images, he’s created whats known as Meet the World. The colors within the flags from its respective country are used to represent current, geographical relevant issues. Take a look.

This is kind of awesome.

(Source: jesusxarmenta, via iwearwatches)

anniebissett:


In Indian civilization I am a Baptist, because I believe in immersing the Indians in our civilization and when we get them under holding them there until they are thoroughly soaked.  –Richard Henry Pratt

 In 1875, seventy two Plains Indians were captured at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and exiled to Fort Marion in St. Augustine, Florida, where they were subjected to military methods of ‘Indian assimilation’ under the direction of Lt. Richard Henry Pratt. Four years later, Pratt secured the permission of officials in the U.S. government to use a deserted military base in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, as the site of a school, and thus began the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. The Carlisle School was the first off-reservation Indian boarding school, and it became a model for Indian boarding schools everywhere. It was in operation from 1879 to 1918, and during that time more than 10,000 students passed through its doors. This print/drawing was created for a 72-artist project called Re-Riding History, curated by Emily Arthur, Martin Begaye, and John Hitchcock. Watch this space for news about where the project will be shown in the months ahead.

anniebissett:

In Indian civilization I am a Baptist, because I believe in immersing the Indians in our civilization and when we get them under holding them there until they are thoroughly soaked.  –Richard Henry Pratt


In 1875, seventy two Plains Indians were captured at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and exiled to Fort Marion in St. Augustine, Florida, where they were subjected to military methods of ‘Indian assimilation’ under the direction of Lt. Richard Henry Pratt. Four years later, Pratt secured the permission of officials in the U.S. government to use a deserted military base in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, as the site of a school, and thus began the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. The Carlisle School was the first off-reservation Indian boarding school, and it became a model for Indian boarding schools everywhere. It was in operation from 1879 to 1918, and during that time more than 10,000 students passed through its doors.

This print/drawing was created for a 72-artist project called Re-Riding History, curated by Emily Arthur, Martin Begaye, and John Hitchcock. Watch this space for news about where the project will be shown in the months ahead.